ruby

Towards a permissive copyleft license for dynamic languages

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The problem

With the recent increase in free-software releases for dynamic languages, a serious issue is there for people who would prefer to give their software the protection of copyleft. The issue is the difficulty of interpreting the Lesser GPL in the context of these languages.

The difficulties in turn from two different sources. First, it is hard to interpret the language of the Lesser GPL in the context of languages that have no object files but only source code files.

OnlineTester: Benchmarking

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This post describes a session measuring the behavior of an Iliad web application using AJAX request. Memory consumption and run time were investigated for different numbers of simultaneous users.

Spoiler


Memory usage has drastically improved since the first public test session, it is down by about 50%. There is still some room for improvement, but the changes of the last two weeks have been impressive. As far as speed and stability is concerned, the application performs very well, even under (relatively) heavy load.

If you want to understand blocks, then learn Smalltalk

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When I was taking a look at Ruby to learn what is it like, I faced a concept called "block". But I never got it bacause you could do everything with a block, also with traditional methods you learned so far. So I asked myself, why would a human being invent something like block? Maybe this is because of the people who tries to explain the blocks or because of my low IQ but this was the case for me when learning Ruby.

A killer feature: copy-on-write #copyFrom:to:

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A killer feature that I would like to add is copy-on-write string handling. For a good example, see this post on ruby-talk (aka comp.lang.ruby):

When you take a substring in Ruby, it doesn't copy the string data. Instead, it just constructs a new string object (just a few words of memory) that references into the original string. Only when either string is modified does the string content get copied.

Lights and shadows of floating point in GNU Smalltalk

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http://www.fourmilab.ch/fourmilog/archives/2007-10/000906.html

For a dynamically-typed pure object-oriented language, the performance delivered by GNU Smalltalk is impressive. The benchmark ran more than twice as fast as Python and 3.4 times the speed of Ruby—“modern” languages often considered descended from Smalltalk. GNU Common Lisp in compiled mode just edged out GNU Smalltalk by about 2%.

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